Hearts not eyeballs

Organic reach. Paid reach. Impressions. Retweets. Presence.

It’s all overrated.

Obsession over analytics and data has led us into a world where we seem to think the number of people you manage to shout at is the measuring stick of marketing success. There are two problems with this.

The first is that only a fraction of those who you have the potential to reach will ever see your content or messaging. Of those who do, you will be lucky if more than 2-3% stop to look properly. An ever smaller portion of those people will actually do anything about it and maybe perhaps consider potentially buying something from you, *if* on the off-chance they happen to feel like it. Not great odds.

The second problem is that by placing such weight on how many people *might* see your work, you become careless and fail to get to know the people who are seeing it. With such a broad church of an audience, you’re forced into a ‘throw shit at the wall and see what sticks’ approach. Again, not great odds.

Instead, marketers and brand builders should be thinking about depth, not width. Focus on what Seth Godin calls the ‘minimum viable audience‘ your business needs to work properly. That might be 10,000 people, or it could be 10. Then, expend all energy, not on trying to grow that number, but on building trust.

Get to know your audience, who they are, what makes them tick, what they find useful, and practice the craft of talking directly to them. Everything you do, say and create should be about serving their needs and rewarding them for their loyalty to your brand.

Do this and you’ll find that by speaking to those who want want to listen your chance of success goes up significantly. Oh, and it’s a hell of a lot less tiring than shouting into the abyss.

Trust

If I were to try and get you to sign up for a paid subscription service where you’d get regular, exclusive and high-value content, all written by me, you almost certainly wouldn’t. Why? Because I haven’t earned your trust – not least because I haven’t posted in over two weeks.*

I haven’t built a solid track record of consistent delivery for any of you to trust that your monthly subscription would be worth it.

Within the last couple of years, my mum has taken up running. Having never done much before, she has persisted in getting out and putting in the miles on a regular basis, and lo’ and behold she’s got herself up to a very respectable standard.

I think she enjoys it now, but she’ll tell you that when she started it was a slog:

“If I only went when I felt like it, I’d never have gone. I had to tell myself that it’s just something I do, not because I feel like it, but because it’s what I do now.”

The people we admire most are those who, come rain or shine, are consistent. They are consistently productive, or polite, or principled, no matter what they’re faced with. It’s that level of consistency that builds admiration and trust.

It’s not just about consistently showing up, but consistently being consistent in how you show up.

How can you show your audience that they can trust you and your brand?

Sam


*Somewhat ironically, the last post I wrote was about ‘showing up early and consistently’ in order to build that trust…

Show up early

Everyone knows the saying.

Trust is earned, not given.

This is true. But how exactly do you earn trust?

The most obvious way is by sticking to your promises. Say you’ll do something? Do it. Say you have a set of principles? Stick to them. Say something is important to you? Prove it.

I’ve talked about this and how it relates to brands before.

But there’s another way brands can earn the trust of their customers – by consistently showing up before they’re required. That is, doing the right thing day in and day out, before you’re called upon to do so by any increased exposure or notoriety.

Whether that’s a commitment to every last detail in the quality of your product, the reliability of your content output, or the way you treat your staff, suppliers or customers right from the off. Your consistency and willingness to ‘show up’ even when no-one else is watching, counts for an awful lot down the line when it comes to earning the trust of those you hope will pay your bills, and someone just happens to notice.

It doesn’t really matter how. What matters is that you did it consistently – and continue to do so – not because it’s looks good, but because it’s important to you.

People can trust that.


Not my best, but I’m here. Showing up. And I’ll be back, hopefully, with something better.

Thanks, as is so often the case, to Seth Godin for the inspiration on this on.